China Watch: Deported Uighurs Get Life, Hating on Han Han, Imperialist Escalators

A list of what The Wall Street Journal’s reporters in China are reading and watching online. (NOTE: WSJ has not verified items in the ‘News’ section and doesn’t vouch for their accuracy.) News : * Deported from Cambodia, two Uighur asylum seekers get life in prison (Reuters) * A Chinese developer buys 16 dairies in New Zealand, anxiety ensues (AP) * One Chinese lawmaker’s idea of a “reasonable” drop in housing prices: 30% (Bloomberg) * Zhang Yimou and Christian Bale’s “Flowers of War” belly flops in the U.S. on its opening weekend (Reuters) Analysis and Commentary : * Former bad boy blogger Han Han has been accused of betraying China’s liberals. Erick Abrahamsen says that’s bunk (IHT) * Not worried about China’s debt? Micheal Pettis offers an extensive argument for why you should be (Carnegie Endowment) * Yale’s Stephen Roach hasn’t given up on the Internet as an instrument of political change in China (Project Syndicate) Just Because : * Widespread ridicule for U.S.-hating scholar Sima Nan after he gets his head stuck in an escalator at Dulles International Airport (Global Voices) * Chinese music in New York (NPR)

A list of what The Wall Street Journal’s reporters in China are reading and watching online. (NOTE: WSJ has not verified items in the ‘News’ section and doesn’t vouch for their accuracy.)

News:

* Deported from Cambodia, two Uighur asylum seekers get life in prison (Reuters)

* A Chinese developer buys 16 dairies in New Zealand, anxiety ensues (AP)

* One Chinese lawmaker’s idea of a “reasonable” drop in housing prices: 30% (Bloomberg)

* Zhang Yimou and Christian Bale’s “Flowers of War” belly flops in the U.S. on its opening weekend (Reuters)

Analysis and Commentary:

* Former bad boy blogger Han Han has been accused of betraying China’s liberals. Erick Abrahamsen says that’s bunk (IHT)

* Not worried about China’s debt? Micheal Pettis offers an extensive argument for why you should be (Carnegie Endowment)

* Yale’s Stephen Roach hasn’t given up on the Internet as an instrument of political change in China (Project Syndicate)

Just Because:

* Widespread ridicule for U.S.-hating scholar Sima Nan after he gets his head stuck in an escalator at Dulles International Airport (Global Voices)

* Chinese music in New York (NPR)

Annual inflows of foreign direct investment rose to nearly $108 billion in 2008.

Deterioration in the environment – notably air pollution, soil erosion, and the steady fall of the water table, especially in the north – is another long-term problem.

The government has also focused on foreign trade as a major vehicle for economic growth.

Some economists believe that Chinese economic growth has been in fact understated during much of the 1990s and early 2000s, failing to fully factor in the growth driven by the private sector and that the extent at which China is dependent on exports is exaggerated.

Technology, labor productivity, and incomes have advanced much more rapidly in industry than in agriculture.

A report by UBS in 2009 concluded that China has experienced total factor productivity growth of 4 per cent per year since 1990, one of the fastest improvements in world economic history.

China’s increasing integration with the international economy and its growing efforts to use market forces to govern the domestic allocation of goods have exacerbated this problem.

On top of this, foreign direct investment (FDI) this year was set to “surpass $100 billion”, compared to $90 billion last year, ministry officials predicted.

” Although the figure is already “quite amazing,” the volume is “not large enough” considering China’s economic growth and local companies’ expanding demand for international opportunities, Shen said.

China is expected to have 200 million cars on the road by 2020, increasing pressure on energy security and the environment, government officials said yesterday.

In large part as a result of economic liberalization policies, the GDP quadrupled between 1978 and 1998, and foreign investment soared during the 1990s.

Despite initial gains in farmers’ incomes in the early 1980s, taxes and fees have increasingly made farming an unprofitable occupation, and because the state owns all land farmers have at times been easily evicted when croplands are sought by developers.

In terms of cash crops, China ranks first in cotton and tobacco and is an important producer of oilseeds, silk, tea, ramie, jute, hemp, sugarcane, and sugar beets.

Fish and pork supply most of the animal protein in the Chinese diet.

Growing domestic demand beginning in the mid-1990s, however, has forced the nation to import increasing quantities of petroleum.

China is among the world’s four top producers of antimony, magnesium, tin, tungsten, and zinc, and ranks second (after the United States) in the production of salt, sixth in gold, and eighth in lead ore.

The largest completed project, Gezhouba Dam, on the Chang (Yangtze) River, opened in 1981; the Three Gorges Dam, the world’s largest engineering project, on the lower Chang, is scheduled for completion in 2009.
Beginning in the late 1970s, changes in economic policy, including decentralization of control and the creation of special economic zones to attract foreign investment, led to considerable industrial growth, especially in light industries that produce consumer goods.

Brick, tile, cement, and food-processing plants are found in almost every province.

The rest is here:
China Watch: Deported Uighurs Get Life, Hating on Han Han, Imperialist Escalators