Wednesday, February 26, 2020

Taiwan Is Safer Than China for Silicon Valley Investment, Says Taiwanese Mayor

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Lin Shih-Hsien, mayor of Changhua City in Taiwan, traveled thousands of miles to California in hopes of bringing some of Silicon Valley’s tech companies to invest in his city.

After almost two years of the Sino-U.S. trade war, many U.S. businesses are now leaving China and looking at different countries in search of cheap labor.

“Your technology and investments are safer in Taiwan,” Lin said in an interview with The Epoch Times on Dec. 6.

Lin compared Taiwan and China and asserted that Taiwan has a well-established democracy and rule of law, which would provide better protection to the intellectual property of American companies.

Lin has visited several tech giants in Silicon Valley, including Google, Apple, Facebook, Nvidia, and Applied Materials. During his multi-city tour of California, he also visited the State Capitol in Sacramento.

He hopes his city can build ties with the Golden State’s agricultural industry.

As the trade war between the world’s two largest economies continues, more and more U.S. corporations are moving out of China. Google, Nintendo, and Dell are among them, The Washington Post recently reported.

According to Fortune magazine, the situation of international manufacturers considering moving out of China long predates the trade war because of rising labor costs.

However, the trade war accelerated this process. Fortune reported that a poll released by the American Chamber of Commerce showed that 40 percent of 250 surveyed firms were “considering or have relocated manufacturing facilities outside of China.”

Lin is just one of the society leaders from Taiwan who has seized the opportunity to try to bring the American corporations leaving China to settle in the island nation across the strait from China.

The U.S. Senate unanimously passed the Taiwan Allies International Protection and Enhancement Initiative (TAIPEI) Act in October, intending to strengthen Taiwan’s global standing. A part of the TAIPEI Act calls on the Trump administration to immediately begin negotiations on a U.S.-Taiwan free trade agreement.

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